By Caroline Rodriguez-Charette
Canada Post workers are using rotating strikes to put pressure on management, while minimizing the postal disruption for their customers. Photo: Lester Balajadia

Canada Post workers are partaking in rotating strikes all across the country, with no indication of when they will end.

The Canadian Union of Postal Workers (CUPW), which represents 50,000 employees, have been on strike since Monday, Oct. 22, due to their demands not being met. The job action will continue to increase if negotiators do not start making some progress.

Postal workers are striking forrequesting wage hikes, pay equality between rural and urban mail carriers, job security, improved benefits, and an overtime ban.

Postal workers are striking for wage hikes, pay equality between rural and urban mail carriers, job security, improved benefits, and an overtime ban.

The union would also like to bring back postal banking, which ended in 1968. Thousands of rural and Indigenous communities do not have banking services, as the big banks have closed 45% of their rural branches in the last two decades.

Mike Palecek, the national president of the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, stated in an interview with the CBC, “We’re trying to get management to move. Negotiations haven’t been fruitful. We haven’t seen a willingness to address any of our fundamental issues.”

The rotating strikes – meaning certain Canada Post locations will walk out at different times for 24 hours – began on Monday, Oct. 22, in Victoria, Edmonton, Windsor and Halifax. CUPW decided on rotating strikes in order to minimize the postal disruption for their customers.

Canada’s largest processing centre in Toronto was on strike for a second time in three weeks on Nov. 6, causing massive backlogs at their facilities. There were over 150 trailers full of mail and packages waiting to be unloaded and sorted out at Canada Post facilities, according to Canada Post spokesman Jon Hamilton.

Customers should expect several days of delay for mail and parcel delivery as the strike activity continues.

CUPW told the Globe & Mail that they plan to carry on with the job action until Canada Post “gets serious about bargaining.”

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